Best Lighting For a Productive Workplace

By Taylor Bickham on 03/14/2019

 

On average, people spend about 13 years and 2 months of their lives in their offices at work. Committing 8 hours per day, 5 days a week to a job can have lasint effects on the body and a worker's overall productivity, Ensuring that your workspace has the right lighting can have a substantial impact on your time at work.

Too Much Light Hinders Productivity

As important as it is to have an adequate amount of lighting in the office especially in spaces that computers are used for extended periods of time, being esposed to too much light can lessen your efficiency at work significantly. Too much light may cause fatigue, stress, and high blood pressure. Fatigue in the workplace can present any number of problems including:

  • Absenteeism
  • Presenteeism
  • Occupational Injuries
  • Workplace Accidents

Inadequate Lighting and the Health of Employees

Dim lighting in office spaces where computers are heavily in use can cause headaches as well as eyestrain. The intensity of the light on the computer screen paired with the lighting (or more appropriately--the lack thereof) in the office can be combatted by turning the brightness of your lighting and limiting the amount of fluorescent lights in use. Try using LED lighting, and don't forget to check out the benefits of making the switch!

The Use of Natural Lighting 

Natural lighting is quite frankly the best option for the workplace, but in the event that natural lighting isn't a feasibile option--the illusion of natural lighting is. LED lighting is measured in lumens, which contrary to popular belief refers not to the brightness of the bulb, but the temperature, unlike its incandescentm fluorescent, and halogen counterparts that are measured in watts. The term "watts" refers to the measurement of the bulb's brightness, Below you'll find a quick rundown of color temperatures in light sources.

Color Temperatures (4,600K or more)

  • present blue-white and are referred to as cool/daylight colors.

Mid Color Temperatures (3,100k-4,600k)

  • present cool white

Warm Temperatures (up to 3,000K)

  • range from red to yellow-white and are referred to as warm colors.

Check out the chart below for bulb temperatures and their effects!

 

 

tbickh_tempchart by Taylor Bickham

Watt Did You Think?

Now that you understand the importance of the right lighting in your workspace, how will you implement LED lighting for a more efficient and effective future? Let us know!

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